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If there’s one occasion you don’t want to be short on photographs, it’s your wedding day. Of course you’ll have a wedding photographer there to capture the special event, but sometimes some of the most memorable pictures are taken by your guests. The infectious excitement and anticipation at these events can make the aspiring wedding photographer come alive. Here are three tips to share with your special party on being a guest and still capturing great photographs:

Pack in a camera that has some zoom capability. To ensure that your guests don’t get in the way of the official photographer, remind them to pack in a camera that has a zoom feature. This will let them capture those special moments from the confines of their seat. 

Consider special moments that the hired photographer might miss. Often the focus during the ceremony is on the bride. Why not ask your guests to try and capture a photograph of the groom’s expression when he first sets eyes on you? Or linger a little longer after the ceremony and capture the after-moments that you won’t get to see, such as the confetti covering the floor.

Forget the posed shots.  There are many things going on during a wedding, and many moments you as the bride might miss. Ask your guests to tell the “behind the scenes” story. Instead of them trying to get a bunch of posed photographs request that they snap away at the natural moments: photograph fellow guests as they chat and laugh, take pictures of waiters serving drinks, or step back and capture the overall setting as everyone mingles. That way you can be sure you’ll have photographs of every moment.

Start the journey to becoming a wedding photographer with the University of Cape Town Digital Photography short course, presented by online education company, GetSmarter. The course starts on 25 March 2013. Quote “Celebration blog” as your promotional code and save R500 on the course fee, when you register before 15 March 2013.  For more information visit www.getsmarter.co.za.

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